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Cheese and Herb Bread recipe

Cheese and Herb Bread recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Bread
  • Bread machine

Fresh and delicious savoury bread that's gorgeous served warm, torn into big pieces. I make the dough in my bread machine, portion it out into small rolls, coat with a herb mixture and then bake them all together.

116 people made this

IngredientsServes: 10

  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons butter, softened
  • 120ml water
  • 120ml milk
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon caster sugar
  • 340g bread flour
  • 1 envelope (7g) dried active yeast
  • For the herb coating
  • 50g butter, melted
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 20g grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried tarragon

MethodPrep:45min ›Cook:30min ›Ready in:1hr15min

  1. Measure the egg, butter, water, milk, salt, sugar, bread flour and yeast into bread machine. Select Dough setting and when unit displays 0:00, press Stop and remove dough.
  2. Place melted butter in a small bowl. In a separate small bowl mix together the paprika, grated cheese, garlic powder and herbs. Cut prepared dough into 15-20 pieces and roll in melted butter, then herb mixture. Arrange the rolls in a lightly greased round baking tin. Cover with a damp tea towel and let rise 30 minutes or until doubled.
  3. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 180 C / Gas 4.
  4. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes or until golden. Serve warm.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(118)

Reviews in English (94)

This bread made such a good impression on my family. Like most other reviews I found the dough to be incredibly sticky once it came out of the bread maker. I kneaded it with a little more flour to make it a bit easier to handle. I used my own Italian herbs, minced garlic and Parmesan cheese for the topping, I added this to the melted butter, which meant I only had to dip the dough once. Next time I think I am going to try using olive oil rather than butter, which I think is more traditional with the toppings I used. The bread was very easy to make, looked great and tasted amazing!-12 Jan 2013

. Really easy using bread machine. I replaced the milk with yoghurt & 1 tablespoon of dried milk powder to thicken the dough as, like others , I found it to be too wet & sticky. This seemed to make it easier to work with. One of my favourites.-29 Mar 2013

by Cindy Camp Been

Very good!! When my dough was done and I went to make the balls, it totally collapsed into a gooey pile, but I still dipped the wads in the butter, and then in my herbs and parm, and after I let it rise it looked like real dough again. In the end it was perfect!! Tasted great, my whole family loved it. Just don't worry if it looks like it flopped, it will come out OK in the end. WONDERFUL!! Thank you, Susanne!-09 Oct 2002


Cheese and herb Beer bread

I have always been absolutely obsessed with beer bread. The flavor, the fact that is so incredibly easy and also that it’s always a crowd pleaser. I have in fact started making two loaves whenever I make beer bread because I know that there will never be enough. I mean, who could say no to a thick slice of warm bread slathered in butter? No one! That’s who.

Of course you could make a simple beer bread which will be just scrumptious but when you add mature cheddar and a few tablespoons of fresh herbs, you take this bread to a new level. It’s the perfect side dish to take to a barbeque/braai/potluck dinner and goes incredibly well with chili con carne. It’s also really amazing toasted, topped with a soft egg and some hot sauce. Basically, you should just make this cheese and herb beer bread and eat it every which way you probably can. You won’t be disappointed!


Irish Cheddar and Herb Soda Bread

Irish soda bread is a type of quick bread that should be in everyone’s repertoire. The loaves are delicious and easy to make – and there are almost unlimited options for putting your own twist on the traditional recipe. The basic loaf is a plain bread that has a rich buttermilk flavor. It’s good on its own (served with butter and jam – my favorite), but you can also make the bread either sweet or savory with a few simple changes. This Irish Cheddar and Herb Soda Bread is a wonderful savory version of a traditional soda bread that is perfect for pairing with hearty stews and warm soups.

The bread is flavored with a generous amount of aged Irish cheddar cheese, which I chose both because it had a delicious flavor and because it tied in nicely with the Irish origin of this bread, and a generous dash of herbs. For the herbs, I used an Herbs de Provence spice blend that is made with thyme, fennel, basil, savory, and lavender. It may not be traditionally Irish, but it worked beautifully with the flavorful Irish cheddar cheese. You could substitute fresh herbs like dill or chives, or your own blend of dried herbs to customize this to suit your tastes. You can also substitute in a different cheddar cheese if you don’t have an Irish cheddar, though I recommend using a higher quality cheddar for the best results in the loaf.

The bread has a crisp exterior crust and a soft center. You can really smell the aromatic herbs, especially when the loaf is fresh, and the cheese adds a nice richness and a hint of salt to the bread. It is good on its own, but it is also excellent when spread with some soft (Irish) butter. Like most soda breads, this one is hand-shaped and baked on a regular baking sheet. You’ll have to get your hands a little bit dirty while shaping the dough, but that is part of the fun of making homemade bread – even simple recipes like this one. It only takes about 5 minutes to put this loaf together and put it into the oven, which means that you can make it even on the busiest evenings and still have fresh bread for dinner.

Irish Cheddar and Herb Soda Bread
2 cups all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
1 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp Herbs de Provence (or dried dill)
1 cup shredded Irish cheddar, divided
1 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 400F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, salt and sugar. Stir in half of the buttermilk, the herbs and 3/4 cup of shredded cheddar. Pour in remaining buttermilk, and stir until dough comes together into shaggy ball.
Place dough on a lightly floured surface and knead for about 1 minute, just until the dough comes together and you can shape it into a fairly smooth ball. Press into a disc about 1 1/2 inches high and place on prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4 cup cheese. Cut a deep cross in the top with a sharp knife.
Bake 30-35 minutes, until the top is a dark golden brown. A toothpick will come out clean when inserted into the center.
Allow to cool on a wire rack before slicing.


Cheese and Herb Stuffed Focaccia

So, what IS the difference between pizza and focaccia? Both are yeasted Italian flatbreads, generally cooked on the floor of a stone oven, and always adorned with toppings and/or fillings ranging from the simple (herbs, olive oil and sea salt) to the sublime (fresh garlic, sun-dried tomatoes, olives, provolone, etc.).

There's actually a main difference, and a lesser one. These flatbreads are called focaccia in the north of Italy, and pizza in the south. In addition, focaccia is generally a bit thicker than pizza, usually carries its enhancements in the dough rather than atop it, and tends to be adorned more simply (though you couldn't prove it by the following recipe). The focaccia below is an instant sandwich — it has its fillings baked right inside.

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 cups (425g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 teaspoons instant yeast
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons (9g) salt
  • 1 tablespoon (8g) Pizza Dough Flavor, optional
  • 2 tablespoons (25g) olive oil
  • 1 1/4 cups (283g) water
  • 1 cup (113g) crumbled Gorgonzola or feta cheese
  • 1 cup (113g) shredded mozzarella or provolone
  • 1/2 cup (21g) fresh basil leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon Maldon sea salt, Fleur de Sel or other large-flake salt
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons fresh rosemary
  • 1 tablespoon (11g) olive oil

Instructions

Weigh your flour or measure it by gently spooning it into a cup, then sweeping off any excess. Combine all of the dough ingredients, then knead — using your hands, a mixer, a food processor or a bread machine — to form a smooth dough.

Place the dough in a greased bowl, cover, and allow it to rise for 1 1/2 hours, or until it's puffy.

Transfer the dough to a lightly floured or lightly greased work surface, knead it gently, then divide it in half. Round each half into a loose ball, and allow the balls to rest, covered, for 10 to 15 minutes.

Roll one ball into a 10" to 12" circle. Place it on a lightly oiled baking sheet or deep-dish pizza pan (or onto a peel dusted with semolina if you'll be baking the focaccia on an oven stone).

Top the shaped round with the filling ingredients, spreading them evenly over the surface, and leaving about 1" crust bare around the edges.

Roll the second half of dough into an equal-sized circle, then place it atop the filling. Press the edges of the dough together firmly to seal the two circles.

Cover the focaccia with a damp cloth, lightly greased plastic wrap or a proof cover.

Preheat your oven to 425°F.

Allow the focaccia to rise for 45 minutes, or until it's noticeably puffy. Just before placing it in the oven, dimple it (poke gentle indentations into it) with your fingers, brush it with 1 tablespoon olive oil, and sprinkle it with large-flake salt and rosemary.

Bake the focaccia for 30 to 35 minutes, until it's golden brown.

Remove it from the oven, and serve it warm, or at room temperature.

Store, well-wrapped, for 3 days at room temperature, or freeze for up to a month.


Bread Machine Cheese Bread

Parmesan, blue, Cheddar, Gruyere. if you like cheese then we've got the bread for you!

This bread made in a bread machine is doubly cheesy with both Parmesan and Cheddar cheese. It's delicious toasted, used for sandwiches, or crumble and use in stuffing recipes.

Method: bread machine
Time: 1-2 hours

Made with bread machine yeast, water, salt, bread flour, Parmesan cheese, dry milk, sugar, Italian herb seasoning

Method: bread machine
Time: 2-5 hours

Made with water, bread machine flour, cheddar cheese, fresh chives, freeze-dried chives, sugar, salt, yeast

Method: bread machine
Time: 2-5 hours

Made with red onion, milk, butter, sugar, salt, garlic powder, paprika, bread flour, active dry yeast, Cheddar cheese

Method: bread machine
Time: 1-2 hours

Made with active dry yeast, milk, water, egg, Gruyere or Swiss cheese, butter, sugar, salt, bread flour

Method: microwave, bread machine
Time: 1-2 hours

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Made with Monterey jack cheese, butter, flat beer, bread flour, sugar, salt, nonfat dry milk, bread machine yeast

Method: bread machine
Time: 1-2 hours

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Method: bread machine
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Made with water, olive or vegetable oil, salt, bread flour, bread machine yeast, sharp Cheddar cheese, green chilies, green onions, ripe olives

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Made with onion powder, salt, water, egg, butter, bread flour, mashed potato flakes, nonfat dry milk powder, blue cheese, sugar

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This Italian cheese is so versatile that it can be used in both sweet and savory recipes from cheesecakes to lasagnas.

Make your mornings a little less hectic with these overnight breakfast recipes. Prep the night before and enjoy a warm, comforting meal in the morning.

A can of cream of mushroom soup can be a real dinner saver. It works great in casseroles and can turn into a sauce or gravy in a pinch.

Online since 1995, CDKitchen has grown into a large collection of delicious recipes created by home cooks and professional chefs from around the world. We are all about tasty treats, good eats, and fun food. Join our community of 202,500+ other members - browse for a recipe, submit your own, add a review, or upload a recipe photo.


How to Make Perfect Garlic, Herb, and Cheese Bread Rolls

What’s instant yeast? Can I use active rise yeast instead?

Think of instant yeast as a sort of foolproof shortcut ingredient. It’s also labelled rapid rise or quick rise yeast and available at most grocery stores (or you can buy my all time favorite yeast on Amazon).

Instant yeast is formulated to allow you to skip proofing (aka the step where you combine the yeast with warm liquid for 5 minutes). You can add it directly into the mix with all of the ingredients and it will increase your rising time.

If you don’t have or can’t find instant yeast, you can easily use active dry yeast instead. Simply combine it with the warm liquid called for in the recipe and allow it to proof for 5 minutes before adding into the bowl with the other ingredients. Most active dry yeast these days are formulated so they usually don’t technically require proofing. But skipping will lengthen the rising period as it will take the yeast longer to get moving.

Tips for Forming & Kneading Bread Dough

This recipe basically directs you to throw everything together in the stand mixer fitted with the dough hook and let the machine do the work until the dough is soft, smooth, elastic, and slightly tacky. It’s ALWAYS better to have a dough that starts more sticky and ends up light and fluffy out of the oven than to add too much additional flour and end up with dense or tough rolls. Remember, as the dough rises it will become less sticky as well.

Can I knead dinner roll dough by hand?

How to Tell When Dough Is Risen

A lot of factors will influence when your dough is done rising and ready to be shaped. Place two fingers in the risen dough up to the second knuckle and then take them out. If the indentations remain the dough is ready to be shaped. If not, cover and let the dough rise longer until the indentations remain. To tell if the shaped bread rolls are done rising, tough the side of one lightly with your finger. If the indentation remains then it’s ready for the oven.

How to Shape Bread Rolls

Once the dough is risen, press it down to deflate it slightly. Use a bench scraper to section the dough into 15 equal pieces. Don’t worry if they’re not perfectly equal in size. However, if you’re a perfectionist you can actually weigh the entire mass of dough, divide that number by 15, then portion each piece perfectly by weight.

As you’re shaping each piece into a round, make sure to pinch the dough into one central point to create a tight ball. This will help the rolls rise beautifully. You can also get creative with the shapes. Check out my video post on 5 ways to shape bread rolls here.

Brush the dough balls with 1 tablespoon of olive oil and sprinkle with the grated Parmesan cheese. Cover and let rise again until doubled in size, about 30 minutes this time. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

How to Make Dinner Rolls Ahead of Time

Basically all yeast dough can be made ahead of time and baked later. Refrigerating dough basically slows the yeast activity and can actually allow more flavor to develop!

Make the dough all the way through to rising once and shaping the rolls. Once the rolls are shaped, cover them and refrigerate for up to 24 hours. Bring to room temperature as the oven preheats before baking as the recipe directs.

If the rolls haven’t doubled in size yet, allow to sit at room temperature until they do. Note that this can take several hours depending on the warmth of your kitchen. If it’s a cold day, preheat the oven to the lowest heat setting for a few minutes, turn it off, then place the pan of dough in the oven to help speed up the rising time.

The rolls are best served the day they’re baked. However, you can easily store leftovers at room temperature for up to 3 days. Reheat the rolls briefly in the oven or toaster oven at 300°F until warmed through to refresh.


How To Make Cheddar-Herb Monkey Bread

Plenty of meals and treats can be prepared in just one pan, including some unexpected recipes! Join chef and food blogger Molly Gilbert as she explores the possibilities (and minimizes the amount of dishes to do later). This cheddar-herb monkey bread may sound like a big, messy project, but it’s actually very easy and a major crowd-pleaser!

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How To Make Cheddar-Herb Monkey Bread

  • Prep Time: 30 minutes plus rising time (if using homemade dough)
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Level of Difficulty: Easy
  • Serving Size: 6 to 8

Ingredients

  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted and cooled, plus more for greasing the pan
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh dill
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese (4 ounces)
  • 2 8-ounce cans refrigerated buttermilk biscuit dough, biscuits quartered, or homemade dough
DIY Dough
  • 2 teaspoons rapid-rise yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups barely warm water
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt

Directions

For the dough

In a large bowl (or in a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook), mix the yeast and water and let it sit for 5 minutes. Add the olive oil, flour, and salt and mix to form a dough. With well-floured hands (or the dough hook), knead the dough until cohesive and elastic.

Transfer the dough to a large bowl misted with cooking spray. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and allow the dough to sit in a warm corner of the kitchen until it has doubled in size, about 1 hour.

When the dough has doubled in size, flour your hands, punch it down, and break off pieces the size of golf balls, rolling each into a smooth ball. Roll the balls in the herb butter and cheddar and layer them in the pan, per the recipe’s instructions. Then cover the Bundt with a clean kitchen towel and let the dough rise once more, this time for 15 to 20 minutes, before baking as instructed.

For the bread

Preheat the oven to 350°F, with a rack in the center position. Grease a 12-cup Bundt pan with butter or cooking spray.

In a medium bowl, stir together the melted butter, thyme, parsley, dill, and garlic. Place the cheddar in a small bowl.

Dunk each piece of dough into the herb butter, then roll in the cheddar. Place the coated dough balls into the prepared Bundt pan, spacing them about ½ inch apart and creating layers.

Transfer to the oven and bake until the bread is fragrant and very brown, with a dark, cheesy crust, 25 to 30 minutes.

Let the bread cool in the pan for 5 to 10 minutes before carefully inverting onto a large plate or serving platter. Serve warm.


No Rise Cheese and Herb Bread

Do yourselves a favor and bake this No Rise Cheese and Herb bread over the weekend. Not because I&rsquom bossy and just told you so, but because there&rsquos loads of reasons why you actually should, that is totally legit.

First: High five to no rise breads. Yes, no yeast in this recipe! Taking the mission out of your prep, because no one wants to wait forty minutes before it even hits the oven.

Second: It&rsquos crammed full of delicious flavors from fresh herbs and pesto. If these herbs came out of your garden, you get an extra star from me.

Third: It&rsquos cheesy. No need to explain.

Forth: I&rsquove been having No Rise Cheese and Herb Bread every day for lunch for the last three days. Store in an airtight container and you&rsquoll have a delicious bite all week long.

Treat the kids after school or just pop a slice or two in hubby&rsquos lunch box. It is also magical to serve along side your weekly roasts or weekend braais AND guess what I&rsquom having with my next bowl of SOUP?


Ricotta Herb Bread Rolls Recipe Tips

Yeast

This recipe utilizes a short cut ingredient: instant yeast. For this recipe you can also use rapid rise or quick rise yeast. One of the 3 should be available at most grocery stores or you can buy my all time favorite yeast on Amazon. These types of yeast are specifically formulated to allow you to skip proofing (aka the step where you combine the yeast with warm liquid for 5 minutes). You can add instant yeast directly into the mix with all of the ingredients.

If you don’t have or can’t find instant yeast, you can easily use active dry yeast instead. Simply combine it with the warm liquid called for in the recipe and allow it to proof for 5 minutes before adding into the bowl with the other ingredients.

Flour

The exact amount of flour you’ll need will depend on your kitchen environment and even the brand of flour you’re using. Things like humidity and altitude can affect your dough. That’s why I give a range of flour instead of a precise measurement in this recipe. You may very well not end up using the full amount of flour. Add it in gradually just until the dough comes together.

I’d always rather have a sticky dough than add too much extra flour and create dense, tough, or dry bread. As the dough rises the flour will continue to absorb extra moisture and it won’t be quite as sticky when you go to shape the rolls anyways!

Ricotta

Use a high quality ricotta cheese in this recipe. Bring the cheese to room temperature before using.

Kneading Bread Dough

Using a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook makes easy work of kneading dough. However, if you don’t have a mixer you can knead this dough by hand. Click here to see my step-by-step video on how to knead dough perfectly by hand.

Rising

The ricotta adds some richness to this dough, so it may take slightly longer to rise than other recipes do. If you’re not sure if your dough is risen, conduct the ripe test: Gently stick two fingers in the risen dough up to the second knuckle and then take them out. If the indentations remain the dough is “ripe” and ready for the next step in the recipe. If not, cover and let the dough rise longer until the indentations remain.

Make Ahead

Basically all yeast dough can be made ahead of time and baked off later on! For this recipe, I like to make the dough all the way through to rising once and shaping the rolls. Once the rolls are shaped, cover them and refrigerate for up to 24 hours. Bring to room temperature as the oven preheats before baking as the recipe directs. If the rolls haven’t doubled in size yet, allow to sit at room temperature until they do.

Refrigerating basically stunts the rise time and can actually allow more flavor to develop!

The rolls are best served the day they’re baked. However, you can easily reheat the rolls briefly in the oven or toaster oven at 300°F until warmed through to refresh.


Cottage Cheese Herb Bread Recipe

Add all the ingredients in the bread pan of bread machine. Process according to manufacturer's instructions for a dough setting. Do not be afraid to open the lid and check the dough. It should form a nice elastic ball. If you think the dough is too moist, add additional flour (a tablespoon at a time). The same is true if the dough is looking dry and gnarly. Add warm water (a tablespoon at a time).

If you can not judge your dough by looking, stick your finger in and feel the dough. It should be slightly tacky to the touch. When the bread machine has completed the dough cycle, remove the dough from the pan to a lightly floured surface. Knead the dough several times and form the dough into an oval cover with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 to 15 minutes.

Stand Up Mixer Instructions:

In a large bowl or in the bowl of a 5-quart stand mixer, add all the ingredients. Using a dough hook, mix all the ingredients together into a uniform dough. It should form a nice elastic ball. If you think the dough is too moist, add additional flour (a tablespoon at a time). The same is true if the dough is looking dry and gnarly. Add warm water (a tablespoon at a time).

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead until elastic, about 15 minutes. In an electric mixer, it should take about 9 minutes. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let rest for 10 to 15 minutes.

After resting, turn dough bottom side up and press to flatten. For baguettes (long, slender) or boules (round), divide the dough into 2 pieces and shape. For baguettes, fold dough into an envelope by folding the top 1/3 of the way to the bottom. Then fold the bottom a 1/3 of the way over the top. Then press dough with the palm of your hand to make an indentation down the center of the dough and fold the top completely to the bottom, sealing the seam with the palm of your hand.

Place on a jelly roll pan dusted with cornmeal. Cover with plastic wrap and place in a warm spot to rise until the dough is doubled in bulk, approximately 30 to 50 minutes (depending on how warm your room is).

Oven Rising: Sometimes I use my oven for the rising. Turn the oven on for a minute or so, then turn it off again . This will warm the oven and make it a great environment for rising bread. If you can not comfortably press your hand against the inside of the oven door, the oven is too hot. Let it stand open to cool a bit.

Cool or Refrigerator Rise: If I do not have the time to wait for the rise to finish or I know that I will be interrupted before the completed rise, I do a cool rise. A cool rise is when the dough is place in the refrigerator and left to rise slowly over night approximately 8 to 12 hours. I usually do this after the first rise and the dough has been shaped into a loaf.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. After rising, slash or score the loaves with a very sharp knife making three 1/2-inch deep diagonal slashes. Bake for 20 minutes or until nicely browned. A good check is to use an instant digital thermometer to test your bread. The internal temperature should be between 200 and 210 degrees F.

Remove from oven and place the loaves on a wire rack until cooled.

Makes 1 large round loaf or 2 small baguettes.

/>I get many readers asking what cooking/meat thermometer that I prefer and use in my cooking and baking. I, personally, use the Thermapen Thermometer . Originally designed for professional use, the Super-Fast Thermapen Thermometer is used by chefs all over the world. I only endorse a few products, on my web site, that I like and use regularly.

You can learn more or buy yours at: Super-Fast Thermapen Thermometer.

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Comments and Reviews

One Response to &ldquoCottage Cheese Herb Bread Recipe&rdquo

Helen K

Thank you for What’s Cooking America for this really nice bread! Easy to make b/c everything is tossed together in the mixer bowl. Healthful ingredients! I doubled the recipe and used 2 loaf pans.

A very nice rise and great texture. Very good taste. Instead of using the suggested herbs, I only used 1 tsp dry fennel seeds. One hardly notices the fennel – except for tasting a trace of “something” slightly sweet and elusive.

I didn’t see any salt in the recipe, so I added 1 tsp of kosher. Next time will use 1-1/2 tsp kosher.

I used: 2 cups of whole wheat flour in place of some of the all purpose flour, a fairly dry cottage cheese – a low fat vacuum-packed brand (Western) that’s lightly salted, a good quality EVOO, and large eggs. Left honey the same as listed. Was not too sweet.

For kneading and rising, I simply did it like I traditionally do with almost any bread using a stand mixer and a floured bread board for final kneading.

The 2nd rise took quite a while b/c I wanted loaves instead of a slender baguette. I slashed each loaf with a razor blade before brushing the tops with cream mixed with a yolk.

I used a convection oven with a shallow pan with hot water on the lower shelf. I forgot to reduce the heat b/c of using glass pans. The next time I will start at 375 degrees and then lower the heat after about 20 minutes to 350 degrees.

When done, the loaves were browned all over and their inner temp as 209 degrees.


Watch the video: Ιδιαίτερα τυροκουλούρια αφρός. Foodaholics Special Feta Cheese Bagels (June 2022).


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